asian cinema takeout cover

After a few months of planning, the first issue of ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT is ready to go!

ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT cover the darker side of Asian Cinema and this issue has plenty of short film reviews for you to pursue…


The ‘zine itself is 20 pages 5.5 x 8.5 inches and in B & W.

You can download it two different ways for FREE:

The read on screen version (PDF) is here:

You can also download the odd and even pages to make your own print copy here:

and for the truly hardcore…you can download the 11 x 17 poster that comes with it:

11 x 17 poster for issue 1

If you wish to contribute to future issues, e-mail me at with “Asian Cinema Takeout” in the subject line. All contributors get a print copy of the ‘zine.


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My thoughts on THE GODFATHERS OF HARDCORE (2018) documentary directed by Ian McFarland

When I started seriously hanging out and around the hardcore & punk scenes of NYC in the summer of 1985, it was in the middle of a lull so to speak between two eras of hardcore music. Pre -1985 was when much of the classic NYHC music would be made. Bands like The Abused, Antidote, The Mob were pretty much history at that point though a few would rise up, still maintaining a presence while the next generation of bands would steamroller through and bring NYHC to a more international awareness. Agnostic Front were one of the original bands that started in, at the time, the small hardcore music scene that came from the Lower East Side/Alphabet City area of NYC. In the early 1980’s, they would record the pretty much instant classics: The United Blood Ep (1983) and Victim in Pain (1984). By the time I came around, they were considered mandatory records to have in your collection. I loved them for their sheer aggression, cryptic but relevant lyrics and they were great records to play loud & really annoy your neighbors.

Controversy though would soon follow Agnostic Front in subsequent years, mostly imagined up by the scene at large. The cover of the original pressings of Victim In Pain featured a graphic image from a WW2 execution of a peasant Jew by an SS Officer. This lead to a call that they were “racist”, “fascist”, etc… Later when it was reissued on a larger label with a plain black cover, some called it censorship (myself included) but it was a decision by the band, not the label which was originally thought. With the release of Cause for Alarm (1986), since the sound was “different” than the previously releases, cries of “AF went metal” were heard all over. (While I didn’t like that particular album back then, a much later in life reassessment of it shows it’s pretty good and not much of a departure…) Maximum Rock N Roll, the biggest punk fanzine at the time, lambasted them at any given moment. Agnostic Front never could get a break.

I bring all this up because I recently found out that a documentary film about Agnostic Front was made and I was asked to come to a screening here in Atlanta. As I thought about it, “I am surprised this wasn’t done sooner”. I went down with high interest and to see what would be brought to light. The film basically follows the two core members, founder Vinnie Stigma and singer Roger Miret through all eras of Agnostic Front. It’s shown in a back and forth style and switching between the two principals often. Both Vinnie and Roger get a lot of time to tell their personal stories and the story of the band they have kept together for 35 years.


On the personal front, the filmmakers, Roger and Vinnie get in depth about their entire lives up to the point of Agnostic Front’s beginnings. Roger’s family came over from Cuba during the revolution and traveled the country, looking for a steady home until they got to NYC. Vinnie, born and raised in NYC, lived on Mott Street his whole life. Somehow it all comes together with Vinnie starting Agnostic Front and after a few singers, Roger Miret taking over that spot for good. Hearing some of the stories are pretty harrowing but both came through it. It was nice to see snippets of both of their modern lives, so strangely somewhat “normal” compared to where they came from.

Where this documentary truly shines is the unseen footage from old shows at A7 and other venues. I was like, “Where did they get this stuff from?” Not just a couple of clips either, tons of edited footage put together for an onslaught to the eyes. For the music historian types, this footage is gold. Seeing some of the other rediscovered footage of old NYC news programs covering punk, “slam dancing” clubs and fashion were eye opening. I remember seeing some of that back then on TV and while most of it was a “warning”, it only caused me to go see it first hand more. There is also many personal photos shown of Roger and Vinnie, their families, the band playing and the scene around them.

After watching The Godfathers of Hardcore, whatever your viewpoints of Agnostic Front, Vinnie and Roger are, you might have to reassess it. This is a very deep character study that shows you that you are probably wrong about them. They are really just a couple of hard working guys that have stuck together through thick and thin, keeping their passion for playing hardcore music intact. By the end, many of my questions that I haven’t thought about for years were answered. Kudos to all involved, it is a solid and memorable film.

Fiend ‘O’ Meter says: 9/10

My Thoughts on Urban Styles: Graffiti in New York Hardcore by Freddy Alva (2017)

It’s really strange when you literally lived through an entire period of a music scene and still missed so much. I have know Freddy Alva since 1988 or so (meeting him where else but at CBGB’s). Since he pretty much grew up in NYC, he was very close to the goings on of the ever growing graffiti culture that the city bred like weeds in a lawn. I do remember him showing me these “black books” of his, small books where graffiti writers would do a piece in them and it became a collection of unique pieces of art. While I was always interested in it, I never paid too much attention at the time. Maybe because where we all hung out, graffiti of all types was everywhere. It was “normal”. It was on every wall, street, cars, trucks, etc… and of course the subways which I was fortunate enough to see before the big clean up in the late 1980’s. Freddy was more into it than I at the time and lucky for us, he put together a tome that collects the art and people associated with the New York City Hardcore scene were we apart of and the graffiti that came with it.

The book covers the years of 1980-1995 and all the people involved. It’s told through interviews and remembrances, graffiti crews that were around and of course the images of the work. It is interesting to hear some of the people I knew back then, talk about graffiti and the influence if had on their lives. Back then, we really only talked music, so so much of this was new to me. The most important thing here is the art. If you have a huge collection of street art, graffiti and graffiti history books like I do, rest assured, Urban Styles has images that have not been published elsewhere. Strangely enough, I was at like every show during this time period and was handed flyers on the regular. This book has flyer art that I have never seen before. I was actually taken aback at points reading this book because of that fact. It just goes to show that Freddy was very thorough while researching and putting this thing together.

Graffiti has a long history and what Urban Styles covers is just a small part of it. If this book didn’t exist, sadly this crucial part of the whole picture would be lost to time. From what I understand, the book is close to sold out. I really hope the publishers decide to reprint it. Anyone who is a fan of this style of art really needs to add this to your book collection, one of the best books on the subject. Period.

Urban Styles Facebook Group

Interview with Freddy Alva on Urban Styles


My thoughts on The Black Panther (2018)!

r_blackpanther_hero_09b05dc9Films I watched in 2018: #34) Black Panther (2018) Fiend ‘O’ Meter says: 8/10

As everyone on here knows, I am an unabashed dye-in-the-wool Marvel Comics fanboy since I was a child. With that said, I passed on so many of the films that have come out in recent years. Leading up to those, these were getting less “Marvely”, too over done and more LCD to the minute. When I heard they were making a film on one of my all time favorites in the Marvel U, I had to throw caution into the wind and hope it just didn’t suck.

The Black Panther film is a combination of the old stories /villains from the 1970’s and the more modern version updated by writer Christopher Priest in the 90’s early 00’s. It captured one of the “make believe” places in the Marvel U very well. Wakanda is a mixture of old world and new high tech and it looks pretty fantastic.

I won’t talk about the film really because if you are a fan of the character it is pretty much all there, something for everyone. The causal viewer will get to see a different kind of comic book film for a change. Any “gripes” I might have with it is all concerning the lead character, The Panther himself. I have always envisioned no matter how much tech Wakanda has, T’Challa would just suit up in the regular ACME edition spandex and fight the baddies. The modern Panther suit is way TOO much and gives no suspense if he actually going to get hurt while in it. The second nitpick is the character is actually quite “dull” compared to many of the other characters presented, especially all the women. They wrote the female characters so strongly, the Panther doesn’t shine as much as he should. With every turn, they get the best lines and characterizations.

It will definitely gets more views from The Fiend but I will wait until the disc comes out. I might actually have to watch Civil War to see how they got The Black Panther to this film. Stay to the VERY end of the credits, looks like a character that was lost…is now found (again?).


Announcing a new ONGOING film fanzine… ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT!

asian cinema takeout cover

OK peeps…the HOUSE OF SKIN has been locked up for the season. It’s 2018 and time for a new ‘zine. This time out we are going to try an ongoing… and it’s called ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT. Based on the Facebook group of the same name, started by the illustrious Jesse Midnitekrawlr, the ‘zine version will be released whenever there is enough content.

ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT will be half sized (5.5″ x 8.5″) and consist of 20 pages each issue. The idea is to knock these out fast. First issue will be out sometime in March 2018!

Thematically, we will be covering films of all eras from the Asian film world, but only ones with a darker theme. Cult, Exploitation, Action, Horror, Smut, etc… you get the idea. While we will graciously accept long form articles/reviews, ASIAN CINEMA TAKEOUT will mostly consist of shorter, paragraph length reviews with many photos and poster art work. Whatever we cannot fit in one issue, will go on to the next. All writings can be old or new. If you have things on an old dead blog, send it, give it new life.

So contact me at: for any more info.

Join the Facebook group here:

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The day has arrived…HOUSE OF SKIN: A DAVID CRONENBERG FANZINE can be downloaded as a PDF to read on screen or printed. This was a months long work of many people as a celebration of the films of David Cronenberg.

Contributor list:

words: Emma Westwood, Perry Ruhland, Jonny Numb, William D. Prystauk, Michael E. Wilson, Rachel Flores Lara, Chris Genro, Bill Meeker, Bill Van Ryn, John Leavengood,
Thomas S. Flowers, Rathan Krueger, Philip C. Perron, Danni Winn, Dr. Jose/Camera Viscera, Jeffery X Martin and Jack J

art: David Johnson (cover), Demeter Lorant (interiors) and E. C. Padgett (comic page)

38 pages 8 1/2 x 11 free download

Get it here! of skin cover with border