Looking for filmmakers for TENDER IS THE FLESH… a short film by Dave K.!

Brief for TENDER IS THE FLESH a short film by Dave K.

Hey peeps! I am working on pre-production for my next short film called TENDER IS THE FLESH, which I am looking to release in early 2019. Thematically, I want to be a homage to old Richard Kern films, specifically Submit To Me and Submit To Me Now. That style… but with a modern twist. It is going to be very graphic design heavy, with more of the frame by frame animations I tend to do. While I am going to be filming my own sequences here in the Atlanta area, I want to invite my film makers (and non-film maker) friends out there to join in.

TENDER IS THE FLESH’s direct theme is Morality In Decay. Sex, Sleaze, Death, Debauchery…you get the gist, with it being flesh/body horror related. I am looking for people to send me short film clips that you made of crazy things like gore, nasty visuals or barren lands with somebody just standing there. Weird street fighting, cemetery photography, burlesque… anything strange…. This is going to be a highly experimental film.

If you have shot a lot of film before and have cutting room floor stuff you never used that would be cool too. Literally looking for 30 seconds or less of footage/clips.

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By submitting anything, you will get credited as a contributor in the credits. You are giving me free reign to edit it in the film as I see fit. You will also get a copy of the DVD when it is eventually made after the finished film is released on Vimeo tentatively in early 2019.

I am not putting out a deadline as this will be a long project and I will always be looking for material until I am ready with the final film. I will be constantly promoting for the rest of 2018 looking for cool stuff. The darker & nastier the better.

Any questions or to send your clips, please hit up my e-mail at: Grandnagus69@yahoo.com

Follow me over on Twitter at: @AFiendOnFilm

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REVIEW: 13 Dolls In Darkness (2017) Directed by Zeda Muller

Let’s just start out by saying that the recent indie horror scene has quite a few gems out there, but it’s littered with so much crap that it’s hard to find anything worthwhile.People who know me, know I don’t hold back from saying if something is not good. My FB Messenger popped up the other day with a message from the film’s director asking if I wanted to see 13 Dolls In Darkness. As I have been wanting to, since all the poster art and trailer has been intriguing as hell, I say said yes, immediately.

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Getting right to it, 13 Dolls in Darkness is one of the best indie horror films I have ever seen. It’s mostly for the tech and effort angle but also for the bold idea behind it. For a low budget film (very LOW), the amount of shots and edits in it… eclipses most films that have seemingly endless budgets. Oh and that opening title sequence…………..

The big selling point is it is a silent film and it’s filmed like it’s on old falling apart nitrate stock that is about to burn up as it goes through the projector. Think like you are watching a film from 1916 (at the proper speed) and you get the idea. (complete with dialogue cards to move the story around…) Every frame is blown out and flickers. Some might get turned off to this but stick with it and you don’t even notice after a while.

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The plot is simple. A lady gets a message from her mother that she is dying and to “come home right away”. She does and an “event” happens and people comes looking for her. A million films are like this right? But none are executed in this fashion and that is why it is so solid a movie. There are so many horror tropes hitting your brain every sequence, why does it seem so fresh? Is this a slasher? A giallo? An “old dark house” film? All of those and none of it. It’s like Zeda squeezed dozens of ideas from horror films between the 60’s through the 80’s through a food processor, poured in a lot of black and white and out came 13 Dolls of Darkness. (I found it humorous that one of the girls in the film is dressed like it’s 1982…) Loads of death, dismemberment and gore too.

Getting back to the tech of 13 Dolls In Darkness. While the low budget bleeds through along the edges, the masterful editing and presentation elevates it to another level. I can only imagine how much time went into cutting this and putting it all together. Makes other filmmakers look lazy by comparison. So much style and heart is in this.

I feel very strongly about this movie. If I had the money to start up my own Bluray/DVD releasing company, I would be so into putting it out. Somebody has too.

Fiend ‘O’ Meter says: 10/10

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3 recent books on Punk Rock & Hardcore Music…

Book looks…Have been off from watching film for a bit to catch up on some essential reading. All three of the following I already have extreme knowledge of but time makes memories fade, so you kind of have to get reacquainted with the subject matter. Reading Roger’s book “My Riot” was a bit of a revelation. I never spoke to him way back then. I saw Agnostic Front play a few times. Never knew enough about the people in the band to form solid opinions on them. There were a ton of “rumors” of course… After reading My Riot, many of my ideas about him were pretty much unfounded. He had a rougher life than I but strangely in a weird way we both had similar paths heading into the NYHC scene. (I didn’t know he grew up much of his young life in the same area of NJ as I did. Talking about taking the PATH train into NYC, brought back a lot of memories) It is a solid autobiography that is eye opening to say the least. Actually, there is an event he describes in the book that I showed up to mere moments after it happened. I wasn’t happy about that night… AY YI YI!

Straight Edge: A Clear-Headed Hardcore Punk History is the 3rd oral history by Tony Rettman. I had no idea this book was being made as I have really spoken to him since the NYHC hardcore book came out a couple of years ago. I am so close to the subject matter, I was really interested to see how it was put together. Previous attempts at books on Straight Edge were so lackluster but Tony knows how to do this documentary style well.
It covers the history and concepts of Straight Edge bands from the humble beginnings in Washington DC to the worldwide movement it has become today. I knew/know so many of the players here, I was looking forward to what they had to say. Wasn’t “surprised” by too much and there really was a lot of new info on some bands I only corresponded with back them (mostly the California bands). I detected very little BS here as much of what was said I remember as true. Again, there are many situations discussed that I was there for so…. There are also many photos culled from private collections that were never published and so many flyers from shows that even I haven’t seen. It’s a great book that belongs on your music history shelf for sure.

My Damage by Keith Morris is an in depth autobiography from the former singer of Black Flag and Circle Jerks. Another book I didn’t know existed until a few months ago and I was very happy to get a copy in my hands. Other than a few facts, I knew very little about the front man of two of my favorite bands of all time. he talks in detail about his upbringing, entry into the LA punk music scene and how his first two bands came to be. His telling of things is a very interesting point of view and I learned quite a bit of how “it went”. He doesn’t hold back and has regrets on some of things he has done in his life. I read this book and wonder how he is still walking among the living.

If you have any interests in old punk and hardcore music, all 3 of these books are high recommends from me. Now, let me get back to some movies….

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My Riot https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072F5DLXH

STRAIGHT EDGE: A Clear-Headed Hardcore Punk History https://www.bazillionpoints.com/product/straight-edge-a-clear-eyed-hardcore-punk-history-by-tony-rettman/#

My Damage: The Story of a Punk Rock Survivor https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DWWCBEK

My thoughts on THE GODFATHERS OF HARDCORE (2018) documentary directed by Ian McFarland

When I started seriously hanging out and around the hardcore & punk scenes of NYC in the summer of 1985, it was in the middle of a lull so to speak between two eras of hardcore music. Pre -1985 was when much of the classic NYHC music would be made. Bands like The Abused, Antidote, The Mob were pretty much history at that point though a few would rise up, still maintaining a presence while the next generation of bands would steamroller through and bring NYHC to a more international awareness. Agnostic Front were one of the original bands that started in, at the time, the small hardcore music scene that came from the Lower East Side/Alphabet City area of NYC. In the early 1980’s, they would record the pretty much instant classics: The United Blood Ep (1983) and Victim in Pain (1984). By the time I came around, they were considered mandatory records to have in your collection. I loved them for their sheer aggression, cryptic but relevant lyrics and they were great records to play loud & really annoy your neighbors.

Controversy though would soon follow Agnostic Front in subsequent years, mostly imagined up by the scene at large. The cover of the original pressings of Victim In Pain featured a graphic image from a WW2 execution of a peasant Jew by an SS Officer. This lead to a call that they were “racist”, “fascist”, etc… Later when it was reissued on a larger label with a plain black cover, some called it censorship (myself included) but it was a decision by the band, not the label which was originally thought. With the release of Cause for Alarm (1986), since the sound was “different” than the previously releases, cries of “AF went metal” were heard all over. (While I didn’t like that particular album back then, a much later in life reassessment of it shows it’s pretty good and not much of a departure…) Maximum Rock N Roll, the biggest punk fanzine at the time, lambasted them at any given moment. Agnostic Front never could get a break.

I bring all this up because I recently found out that a documentary film about Agnostic Front was made and I was asked to come to a screening here in Atlanta. As I thought about it, “I am surprised this wasn’t done sooner”. I went down with high interest and to see what would be brought to light. The film basically follows the two core members, founder Vinnie Stigma and singer Roger Miret through all eras of Agnostic Front. It’s shown in a back and forth style and switching between the two principals often. Both Vinnie and Roger get a lot of time to tell their personal stories and the story of the band they have kept together for 35 years.

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On the personal front, the filmmakers, Roger and Vinnie get in depth about their entire lives up to the point of Agnostic Front’s beginnings. Roger’s family came over from Cuba during the revolution and traveled the country, looking for a steady home until they got to NYC. Vinnie, born and raised in NYC, lived on Mott Street his whole life. Somehow it all comes together with Vinnie starting Agnostic Front and after a few singers, Roger Miret taking over that spot for good. Hearing some of the stories are pretty harrowing but both came through it. It was nice to see snippets of both of their modern lives, so strangely somewhat “normal” compared to where they came from.

Where this documentary truly shines is the unseen footage from old shows at A7 and other venues. I was like, “Where did they get this stuff from?” Not just a couple of clips either, tons of edited footage put together for an onslaught to the eyes. For the music historian types, this footage is gold. Seeing some of the other rediscovered footage of old NYC news programs covering punk, “slam dancing” clubs and fashion were eye opening. I remember seeing some of that back then on TV and while most of it was a “warning”, it only caused me to go see it first hand more. There is also many personal photos shown of Roger and Vinnie, their families, the band playing and the scene around them.

After watching The Godfathers of Hardcore, whatever your viewpoints of Agnostic Front, Vinnie and Roger are, you might have to reassess it. This is a very deep character study that shows you that you are probably wrong about them. They are really just a couple of hard working guys that have stuck together through thick and thin, keeping their passion for playing hardcore music intact. By the end, many of my questions that I haven’t thought about for years were answered. Kudos to all involved, it is a solid and memorable film.

Fiend ‘O’ Meter says: 9/10

http://thegodfathersofhardcore.com/

My Thoughts on Urban Styles: Graffiti in New York Hardcore by Freddy Alva (2017)

It’s really strange when you literally lived through an entire period of a music scene and still missed so much. I have know Freddy Alva since 1988 or so (meeting him where else but at CBGB’s). Since he pretty much grew up in NYC, he was very close to the goings on of the ever growing graffiti culture that the city bred like weeds in a lawn. I do remember him showing me these “black books” of his, small books where graffiti writers would do a piece in them and it became a collection of unique pieces of art. While I was always interested in it, I never paid too much attention at the time. Maybe because where we all hung out, graffiti of all types was everywhere. It was “normal”. It was on every wall, street, cars, trucks, etc… and of course the subways which I was fortunate enough to see before the big clean up in the late 1980’s. Freddy was more into it than I at the time and lucky for us, he put together a tome that collects the art and people associated with the New York City Hardcore scene were we apart of and the graffiti that came with it.

The book covers the years of 1980-1995 and all the people involved. It’s told through interviews and remembrances, graffiti crews that were around and of course the images of the work. It is interesting to hear some of the people I knew back then, talk about graffiti and the influence if had on their lives. Back then, we really only talked music, so so much of this was new to me. The most important thing here is the art. If you have a huge collection of street art, graffiti and graffiti history books like I do, rest assured, Urban Styles has images that have not been published elsewhere. Strangely enough, I was at like every show during this time period and was handed flyers on the regular. This book has flyer art that I have never seen before. I was actually taken aback at points reading this book because of that fact. It just goes to show that Freddy was very thorough while researching and putting this thing together.

Graffiti has a long history and what Urban Styles covers is just a small part of it. If this book didn’t exist, sadly this crucial part of the whole picture would be lost to time. From what I understand, the book is close to sold out. I really hope the publishers decide to reprint it. Anyone who is a fan of this style of art really needs to add this to your book collection, one of the best books on the subject. Period.

https://www.amazon.com/Urban-Styles-Graffiti-York-Hardcore/dp/099134474X

Urban Styles Facebook Group

https://www.facebook.com/Urban-Styles-Graffiti-In-New-York-Hardcore-1644635112469700

Interview with Freddy Alva on Urban Styles

http://www.soundrenaissance.net/freddy-alva-urban-styles/

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Southern Fried Game Room Convention Atlanta June 10th-12th 2016

A couple of years ago, a group of folks started up a arcade video game/pinball convention here in Atlanta, which I attended. Loved it but missed last year’s show. I was determined to get my hands on some of my favorite pinball machines again, even if it was a for a brief moment. This year’s show was larger and much more varied that the previous one I was at. My heart is in pinball, so while they had classic video games (consoles and arcade) and board gaming, I only was there to play the silverball. Since a convention like this is dependent on people to actually bring their personal machines to it, each time it will vary with the amount and quality of the machines. Your heart sinks when you go to play a particular machine and it’s been turned off due to a wide variety of issues. You always have to remember many of these machines are 30 years old and have been hammered with use. I did get to play my 2nd favorite pinball of all time, Mata Hari, which surprisingly they had two! They tried to group together machines by era and did a great job of it. Having beautiful machines such as Space Invaders, Fathom and Centaur right next to each other would have probably never happened in 1981, but in this “fantasy” arcade they can.

I never take these shows for granted as they are truly interactive and keep your interest. Sadly for me though, I only last a couple of hours after I have had my fill and the crowds start to get bigger. Plus I really have little interest in the over done newer machines and the all video pinball. There are a lot of folks into this and I’m glad the appreciation for the old pinball machines is growing. It’s an expensive hobby, one I cannot afford, so the once a year I can go down and jam on some these…I am grateful. Go to the site here: Southern Fried Gameroom Expo for more info.

See all the photos I took here: My photos of the SFGE 2016!